Reproductive Health Disparities: Understanding the Past, Explaining the Present, and Changing the Future

The state of Black maternal health in the USA is well known to be unacceptably poor. 69% of all pregnancies are unintended and Black women are 3-4 times more likely to die during childbirth compared to white women (ACOG). Enroll into Clue's new course to learn more about improving racial and ethnic health disparities.

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The state of Black Maternal health in the USA is well known to be unacceptably poor.

69% of all pregnancies are unintended and Black women are 3-4 times more likely to die during childbirth compared to white women (ACOG). Even when factors such as education and socioeconomic status are controlled, Black women still have the highest rates of poor health outcomes and maternal mortality. Black women also have the highest rate of mammography screening and yet the highest rate of death from breast cancer. ACOG has found that factors such as stereotyping and implicit bias on the part of health care providers contribute to racial and ethnic disparities in health. Are you part of the solution or part of the problem? Check out Clue's latest course to learn more about improving racial and ethnic health disparities.

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Course Presenters

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Dr. Lynae M. Brayboy

Chief Medical Officer at Clue

MD

Dr. Karen A. Scott

An associate professor in Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences and Humanities and Social Sciences, at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF).

MD, MPH, FACOG

Dr. Deirdre Cooper Owens

Director of Program in African American History. Also The Charles and Linda Wilson Professor in the History of Medicine and Director of Humanities in Medicine at UNL.

Ph.D.

Dr. Dána-Ain Davis (pronounced Donna Eye-een)

Director of the Center for the Study of Women and Society.

MPH, Ph.D.

Course Outline

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Dr. Lynae M. Brayboy

Welcome & Introduction

Aims of course:

  • Identify the historical importance of racism in medicine and specifically obstetrics and gynecology in the U.S.
  • Review the root causes of maternal morbidity and mortality among Black women and other racial minorities
  • Learn of ways to improve culturally competent care and provide resources to patients
  • Examine your own biases


Dr. Karen A. Scott

Part 1: Root Of The Problem

  • Definition of Reproductive Health Disparities
  • Overview of Reproductive Health Disparities around the world
  • Which groups suffer from Reproductive Health Disparities in the US?
  • Review of literature in Reproductive Health Disparities in Black women
  • Why are we focusing on Black women? 

Dr. Deirdre Cooper Owens

Root Of The Problem (cont.)

  • History of Medicine and Slavery
  • Reproductive Control of Slavery
  • Myths and Stereotypes in Medicine 
  • Origins of Modern Gynecology
  • History of Maternal/Fetal Mortality

Dr. Dána-Ain Davis

Part 2: Present Day Problems

  • Discuss the impetus for the book  Reproductive Injustice
  • Discuss  research findings 
  • What is the unifying theme with Black maternal morbidity?
  • Discuss implicit bias of HCPs?
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Learn more about improving  reproductive racial and ethnic disparities.

Dr. Joia Crear-Perry

Part 3: The Solution

  • Perspective on Louisiana
  • Introduce NBEC and its work
  • March for Moms
  • Discuss bias that is personally experienced as a Black Physician from colleagues

Ms. Nicole Jean-Baptiste

The Solution (cont.)

  • What is a doula? What is a doula’s role in a healthcare setting?
  • How can doulas help patients?
  • How can doulas and HCPs work together to help patients?
  • Medicaid and Private Insurance coverage of doulas
  • Grassroots organization: Bronx Rebirth

Dr. Joia Crear-Perry

A thought leader around racism as a root cause of health inequities, Speaker, Trainer, Advocate, Policy Expert, and fighter for justice - is the founder of the National Birth Equity Collective.

MD, FACOG

Ms. Nicole Jean-Baptiste

A maternal health and reproductive justice advocate whose pursuits intersect with the aim of improving maternal health systems.

Labor and Postpartum Doula, CD, CLC, RYT

Webinar Description

The state of Black Maternal health in the United States has long been known to be threatened. Black women are 3-4 more times likely to die during childbirth compared to white women (ACOG). Even when factors such as education and socioeconomic status are controlled for Black women still have highest rates. Of all pregnancies in Black women 69% are unintended (ACOG). Black women have the highest rate of mammography screening and yet the highest rate of death from breast cancer. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists summarized that research that found that factors such as stereotyping and implicit bias on the part of health care providers contribute to racial and ethnic disparities in health. Are you part of the solution or part of the problem? Join Clue’s free CME webinar to learn more about improving racial and ethnic health disparities.

This program is sponsored with an educational grant from Clue